Friday, May 10, 2019

Vintage Recipe: Chili Sauce

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


This recipe for Chili Sauce was handwritten in pencil on an index card that had been darkened with time. It was found in a small red metal recipe file box worn with age. The recipe is dated “7-28-39”. The reverse side of the recipe card has a canning recipe for “Uncooked Tomato Relish“.

See other recipes from this collection!

The recipe has no information beyond “Pack in pt jars”. Packing your hot food into jars and allowing the jars to seal on their own with no type of processing is call the “Open Kettle Method”. This method is no longer considered safe.

From the National Center For Home Food Preservation website:
Why is open kettle canning not recommended?
In open kettle canning, food is cooked in an ordinary kettle, then packed into hot jars and sealed without processing. The temperatures obtained in open kettle canning are not high enough to destroy all spoilage and food poisoning organisms that may be in the food. Also, microorganisms can enter the food when it is transferred from the kettle to jar and cause spoilage.

I recommend you refrigerate or freeze your chili sauce. If you choose to make this recipe and can it, PLEASE use an approved canning method. The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!


CAUTION: This is a vintage canning recipe. Canning methods and procedures are continuously being updated as new foods are tested and safer methods are developed. The methods and procedures in this recipe may be very outdated. Following unsafe canning practices can result in food spoilage, mold and the growth of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum which can cause botulism—a deadly form of food poisoning. I urge you to visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation website (http://nchfp.uga.edu/) for the most updated safety information for food preservation. Compare this recipe to their safe, tested recipes and make adjustments as necessary to ensure you are canning a safe product for your family.


Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer. We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.

vintage recipe, canning, chili sauce, old fashioned
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Chili Sauce

ingredients:


  • 18 Tomatoes
  • 1 tsp. Cloves
  • 1 tsp. Cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. Allspice
  • 1 tsp. Nutmeg
  • 2 Tbs. Salt
  • 3 Onions, chopped
  • 1/2 cup Granulated Sugar
  • 1 Green Pepper, chopped
  • 2 Cups Vinegar

instructions:


  1. Peel Tomatoes
  2. Boil all together 2 hours
  3. Pack in pint jars

NOTES:

Original recipe is dated 7-28-39

The recipe has no information beyond “Pack in pt jars”. Packing your hot food into jars and allowing the jars to seal on their own with no type of processing is call the “Open Kettle Method”. This method is no longer considered safe. I recommend you refrigerate or freeze your chili sauce.

CAUTION: This is a vintage canning recipe. Canning methods and procedures are continuously being updated as new foods are tested and safer methods are developed. The methods and procedures in this recipe may be very outdated. Following unsafe canning practices can result in food spoilage, mold and the growth of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum which can cause botulism—a deadly form of food poisoning. I urge you to visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation website (http://nchfp.uga.edu/) for the most updated safety information for food preservation. Compare this recipe to their safe, tested recipes and make adjustments as necessary to ensure you are canning a safe product for your family.
Created using The Recipes Generator




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