Friday, February 22, 2019

Vintage Recipes: Peanut Butter Frosting

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


This recipe for Peanut Butter Frosting was handwritten in beautiful script on an index card. The recipe is part of a modest collection of vintage recipes, some dating back to the 1940s. Other than this clue, the age of the recipe card is unknown.



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Friday, February 15, 2019

Vintage Recipe: Chocolate Frosting

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 

This recipe for “Frosting” is actually for Chocolate Frosting. It was handwritten on an index card. The recipe is part of a modest collection of vintage recipes, some dating back to the 1940s. Other than this clue, the age of the recipe card is unknown.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!


See more recipes from this collection

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer. We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
vintage recipe, chocolate frosting, icing
Pin it

Chocolate Frosting

ingredients:


instructions:


  1. Melt Chocolate.
  2. Add sugar, egg and vanilla. Beat until smooth.
  3. Add butter 1 Tbsp at a time, beating smooth after each addition.
Created using The Recipes Generator




DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Whitening Old Yellowed Plastics - Hallmark Snoopy Ornament

While thrift shopping, I came across an old ornament from the late 1970s that I didn't want to leave behind. It was the first in the Hallmark Snoopy series of Panorama ornaments. The problem was, it was so yellowed!


I wasn't sure whether the yellowing was from age or from storage conditions, but I knew I wanted to at least TRY to revive it.


While researching how to do this, I came across this video:



The video shows how to use a Sally Beauty Supply Peroxide creme and UV light to remove the yellowing from plastics. It seemed this was at least worth a shot so I stopped by a local Sally Beauty Supply and picked up a small 4oz. bottle of the 40 Volume Creme Developer. It was very inexpensive (less than $2) and if it worked, I could always go back for the larger bottle for future products.


I didn't have a UV light as suggested in the video so I was going to have to chase the sun around with my little ornament.

Wouldn't you know it, the clouds decided to stick around for the next few days after I started this project. The first day, I noticed the peroxide dried out on the surface. I wasn't sure it this made a difference, but I reapplied the creme and then stuck the ornament into a plastic zip top bag. That kept the peroxide fresh and meant I didn't have to worry about getting it on everything (I later learned that keeping it in the plastic bag wasn't such a good thing - it exposed the metal cap and gold foil trim to constant moisture ).

I think this picture best shows just how yellowed the ornament was. I covered the cap in tape and had just slathered a layer of the peroxide creme all over the plastic.

Whenever the sun popped out, we would put the ornament outside to catch some rays. Other times, especially on very windy days, we would set the ornament inside on a windowsill.

You can see where the peroxide creme was really effective here. It is where the creme was the thickest. This was after the first day.
Even with limited sunlight, the peroxide worked its magic! After a week of doing this (and forgetting about it a couple times until late in the day), it appeared all the yellowing was gone!


You can see the damage that the peroxide did to the gold trim. If I were to do this again, I would be more patient and not use the zip top plastic bag.

I tried this with a couple of other yellowed items and they have been revived as well! There are still plenty more projects available in that tiny bottle of peroxide, making it very cost effective, too.

So if you happen to have some yellowed plastics around your house, perhaps give this stuff a try. Only a couple bucks at your local Sally Beauty Supply (though you can also buy it online at Sally Beauty Supply or Amazon).



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Friday, February 8, 2019

Vintage Recipe: Coffee Frosting

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 

This recipe for Coffee Frosting was handwritten on an index card. It was found in a modest collection of old recipe cards. The age of this particular recipe card is unknown.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!


See more recipes from this collection

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer. We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
vintage recipe, coffee frosting, icing
Pin it

Coffee Frosting

ingredients:


  • 2 Egg Whites
  • 1½ cups Granulated Sugar
  • ½ tsp. Cream of Tartar
  • 1/3 cup Strong Coffee
  • 2 tsp Light Corn Syrup

instructions:


  1. Combine ingredients in top of double boiler, stir to blend well.
  2. Place over boiling water and beat until frosting holds it's shape. Remove from heat.
  3. Continue to beat until frosting stands in peaks.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, February 7, 2019

Cleaning Your Dryer Vent

Last month in my organizing tips, I mentioned the surprising amount of lint we blew out of our dryer vent last summer. I wanted to go a bit more in detail about that since it was so unexpected and really changed our maintenance routine (and let's not forget that dryer lint is a huge fire hazard).

According to FEMA, "2,900 home clothes dryer fires are reported each year and cause an estimated 5 deaths, 100 injuries, and $35 million in property loss. Failure to clean the dryer (34 percent) is the leading cause of home clothes dryer fires."

Our dryer vents are really long - a serious design flaw in the house. Last summer, our dryer started taking longer to dry - to the point that we considered calling a repairman. 

One afternoon, Mr. LH and I pulled out the dryer (no small feat in our tiny laundry space). We detached the vent hose from the dryer and vacuumed out the dryer exhaust and the end of the hose. I also went outside to clean out that side of the vent. While we were standing there with our dryer pulled out and the vent opening exposed, I suggested we use our leaf blower to force air into the dryer vent, hopefully to blow out any extra lint that might be clinging to the sides of the vent (we had done this in our other homes in the past with some success).

What resulted shocked us. After only a few seconds of directing the leaf blower into the vent, a HUGE cloud of lint exploded out the vent and deposited a massive lint pile into our back yard!

I gathered up the lint and took a photo
We clean our lint trap after every cycle. I also run a long lint catcher (you can use a Swiffer Duster) into the lint area regularly to collect any loose lint, regularly wash the screen AND make it a point to check the outside exhaust to be sure there is no build-up. I didn't expect to have so much lint built up INSIDE the vent!

There is no telling how ling this had been building up. We had already lived in the the house for two years at the time and didn't have furry pets (now the Girl has a guinea pig) but the lint had dog or cat hair in it. It's possible the dryer vent had NEVER been fully cleaned out.

Anyway, I was so surprised by the shear amount of lint that I posted the photo, along with a public service announcement, on NextDoor for my neighbors to see.


One neighbor mentioned she experienced a fire in her childhood home because of dryer lint. Another neighbor, with the same floor plan as ours, was so alarmed by this that she tried using a leaf blower. When nothing came out of her vent, she went down to the crawl space and disassembled her dryer vent. She said there was a HUGE clog. Her vent was so packed full of lint that the forced air from the leaf blower could not get through it or move it. And with every use of the dryer, the situation got worse. It was a huge fire hazard. I am so thankful she was able to clear her dryer vent!

Clean those vents. No joke. We have added "Blowing Our the Dryer Vents" to our regular 6 month maintenance plan.





DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Friday, February 1, 2019

Vintage Recipe: Peanut Butter Fudge

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 

This recipe for Peanut Butter Fudge was handwritten in beautiful blue script on an index card. It was found mixed up in a modest collection of recipes dating back to the 1940s. This particular recipe card had the date 9/9/41 written on the bottom. Also “Seattle P.I.”. We’re not sure, but perhaps this is a publication where the original recipe came from.

Also noted on the recipe card is “12/83 Doesn’t set – use less milk?”


We made this recipe (using salted butter and omitting the pinch of salt) and found that when heated to the correct temperature (soft ball stage), it does indeed set. Soft ball stage is 240°F but is different at high altitude. To adjust for your altitude, decrease the temperature 2° for every 1000 ft above sea level. I am just below 6000 ft which meant for my altitude, soft ball stage would be 12° less. I cooked the sugar and milk mixture to 228°F (240°F - 12°F = 228°F).

Waiting for the soft ball stage. I'm using a Wilton Candy Thermometer that clamps to the side of the pot.

I added in the butter and then the peanut butter. Almost as soon as I added the peanut butter and started stirring, the mixture practically seized on me! I didn't have a chance to take a picture because I was scrambling to do something with it.



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.