Saturday, August 18, 2018

Rowoco Game Pie Fluted Tin Mould


I practically snatched this out of Mr. LH's hand when I saw him with it at the thrift store! All HE knew was it had something to do with baking and didn't he see something like it on "The Great British Baking Show"? YES! I binge watched a couple seasons on Netflix several months ago so he was stuck overhearing it.

This is a Game Pie Tin or Oval Fluted Pate Mould. In The Great British Baking Show, it was being used by a contestant for a "picnic pie" with a hot water crust pastry and filled with meat and veggies. It looked divine!

This particular one might be a tad bit smaller. It measures approximately 9 ½” L x 4 ½” W x 2 7/8” H (not including clips). It also has a sticker on it with ROWOCO France. It appears to be in VERY good shape, and with the sticker still on it, I wonder it it has ever been used.

Looking for a recipe to use? Here is one from The Great British Baking Show: Raised Game Pie

These appear to be very hard to find. As much as I would love to keep this one in my own kitchen, it's going in our Etsy shop.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Vintage Recipes: High Altitude Baking Adjustments

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


Of course, when you dig through a box of recipes that came from the Rocky Mountain region, it makes perfect sense that you would run into a recipe card with “High Altitude Baking Adjustments” on it.



High Altitude Baking can be a frustrating experience, especially for those new to the challenge. The tips found on this recipe card will give you a place to start when trying to adjust your recipes for a higher altitude.

Please note the adjustments start at 5000 ft which may be higher than your altitude. I presume the information was published in the Denver area which sits at 5280 feet above sea level so their readers would probably not have a need for instructions for a lower altitude.

I don’t suggest trying to convert ALL your recipes to high altitude unless you have a lot of patience and time on your hands…or unless you just plain ‘ol WANT to. It took me several weeks to get my bread machine recipe right so I’ve only fussed with a handful of recipes.

Sometimes it makes sense to find some new family favorites. I recommend taking a look at a couple of my favorite high altitude baking books, Pie in the Sky by Susan G. Purdy and Sharing Mountain Recipes: The Muffin Lady’s Everyday Favorites by Randi Lee Levin.


Also, check out second hand bookstores for local cookbooks (like those usually used by schools or churches as fundraisers). You can find a lot of high altitude family favorites in those cookbooks.

Please Note: 
We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Monday, August 6, 2018

NFL Football Teams Cross Stitch Patterns


Football season is coming up fast! We were thrilled to come across this vintage NFL cross stitch pattern book by Nomis.

It includes 28 NFL teams from 1987. Each team has a helmet pattern and a team name pattern. There is even a blank helmet pattern so you can create your own! That's 57 different patterns in all in this book!


You can create all kinds of football gifts with vintage team logos for your favorite NFL fan!

Find this NFL pattern book (and read all the details about it) as well as other cross stitch books in our Etsy shop.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Vintage Recipe: Barbara's Apple Cake

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen.


This recipe for Barbara’s Apple Cake was handwritten on an index card. It was found in an old large recipe file box. The age of the recipe card is unknown.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer. We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.

Pin it

Barbara's Apple Cake

Find more vintage recipes at www.littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 1 1/2 Cup Wesson Oil
  • 1 1/2 Cup Sugar
  • 2 Eggs
  • 3 Cups Flour
  • 1 tsp Baking Soda
  • 3 Cups Fresh Apples (chop then measure)
  • 1 Cup Pecans, chopped
  • 1 tsp Salt

instructions:

Mix all ingredients together. Bake in an ungreased tube pan at 350 F for 1 hour.

NOTES:

I suggest letting this cake cool almost completely before trying to turn it out of the pan (I only waited about 10 minutes and a lot of it stuck to the pan bottom).

The cake tasted good (better when cold) but was oily tasting. I might try replacing half the oil with applesauce. The pan may need to be sprayed or greased and floured if you try this option.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Monday, July 9, 2018

Canning Maraschino Cherries


Last year I saw someone post on Facebook about canning maraschino cherries. Mmmm...I thought. That sounds good. Maybe I could make them myself and have some great cherry flavor without that weird waxy texture.

But cherries were going out of season by the time I saw the post. So I forgot about it.

Last week someone posted a photo of their pot of cherries in brine, the first step in making maraschino cherries, and I remembered cherries were currently $1.29 a pound at Sprouts. It was time.

I couldn't find the original recipe on the Oregon State University Extension's website so I printed out a photo of the recipe. Royal Anne cherries were called for. Perhaps they are firmer? Sprouts didn't have Royal Anne cherries so I opted for the regular cherries, simply named "sweet cherries" (they were the ones that were on sale anyway).

I only needed 4 1/2 lbs of cherries for the recipe but I bought 15 pounds. FIF-TEEN POUNDS. I guess I'd better stock up while the price is low, huh?

The recipe is easy to follow but it does take three full days before you can actually can them. They were super sweet (I'll cut WAY back on the sugar next time I make them) but I served it "over ice cream to cut the sweetness" and it was really good. A couple scoops of ice cream, a few cherries and some juice drizzled over the whole thing! YUM!


The cherries weren't firm but they held up well. They also still retained their cherry flavor, even with all that sugar.


The recipe would up making 8 half-pints of cherries in syrup and 3 half pints of syrup. I also had another half pint that was about half filled with cherries and then filled to the top with syrup that went straight into the refrigerator.

I contacted the Oregon State University Extension about their missing recipe and here was their response:

OSU Extension has recently redesigned our website. We are in the process of review and recommendations for further revision, bear with us!  
Here is a link to the archive that has the marachino cherry recipe. I suggest you download and save it somewhere safe, I don't believe these archives will remain accessible for very long. 
https://archive.extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/sites/default/files/images/sp50492.pdfhttps://archive.extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/food-preservation/publications#food_safety/  
Thanks for letting us know this one was of interest and missing!

Items shown in post photos:

Kerr wide-mouth half pint jar
Vintage Federal Glass Dessert Cup



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Friday, June 1, 2018

Vintage Recipe: Burritos (from Leftovers) and Guacamole

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen.


These Burritos are made using leftover roast beef. You cold also use shredded pork, chicken or ground beef. And of course, you don’t have to use leftovers. It also includes a recipe for guacamole.

The recipe was handwritten on both sides of an index card. It was found in an old large recipe file box. The age of the recipe card is unknown.


The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer.

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
Pin it

Burritos (from Leftovers)

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:

Burritos
  • Leftover Roast Beef (shredded)
  • sprinkle of Garlic Salt
  • 1 can Diced Tomatoes (16 oz)
  • 1 can Diced Green Chilies (4 oz)
  • Green Onion (chopped)
  • 1 can Refried Breans
  • 1 can Olives (small can sliced)
  • Flour Tortillas
  • Cheddar
Guacamole
  • 1 cup Sour Cream
  • 1 Avocado, pitted and mashed
  • 1 TBS Lemon Juice
  • 1/2 tsp Chili Powder
  • Tabasco Sauce
  • Garlic Salt
  • Salt
  • Pepper

instructions:

Simmer shredded roast beef, garlic salt, diced tomatoes, green chilies and green onion in a covered pan for 20 minutes.

Add refried beans and olives. Warm for 10 minutes.

Mix all guacamole ingredients together and set aside.

Warm flour tortillas.

Serve beef filling in flour tortillas. Top with cheese and guacamole.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Income Using PODs (Print on Demand)

I've recently expanded one of my tiny side Etsy business by making t-shirts, invitations, buttons and more through various Print-On-Demand services (POD's) as a way to supplement the income I make through Etsy and freelancing.

The Botanical Blue Wedding Collection on Zazzle

I love my Etsy Shop, The Peddler's Cart! It's lots of fun and keeps me plenty busy. But in order to not take away time from my shop, anything else I do to earn an income will need to require very little of my time in the long run so I'm working on building up more passive income streams.

Unfortunately, setting up those passive income streams is not exactly passive. I guess if it was easy and took relatively no time at all, everyone would do it. But is has been a nice creative outlet for me and I get a little better using my software with each design I make.


The Girl has even gotten involved. I pay her for some of her drawings which I then put onto products to sell (she preferred this option for now rather than waiting to split any royalties). This opened up the opportunity to talk to her about copyrights and contracts so she can learn how to protect herself and her artwork.

The shirts with artwork by The Girl can be found on Amazon as well as her Furry Fandom shirts 

I'm hoping she'll see the potential to make money on the side while she pursues her other (currently non-paying) art ambitions.


For the most part, I am only using services where the platform takes care of all the printing and related customer service. This leaves me free to only design and work on my other endeavors (and to not fall too far behind on everything else that needs doing with homework, housework and errands).

It's been a pretty fun side hustle so far!

You can find these items and more on Facebook, Amazon, Etsy, Redbubble and Zazzle.




DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, May 24, 2018

Graduation for The Boy

It's been 7 years since we were here in this exact place. The Richie Center at UC-Denver.

#2 is finally graduating.


Where has the time gone?

I still remember taking his picture on the first day of kindergarten.


When we moved to Colorado he was still in elementary school!


Now he's graduating from HIGH SCHOOL?!?


Only one more to go!




DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Sunday, April 8, 2018

Vintage Recipe: Golden Punch

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


This recipe for Golden Punch was handwritten on an index card, mixed up in a modest collection of recipes (some dating back to the 1940s). It’s age is unknown.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer.

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
Yield: 32 - 40 servingsPin it

Golden Punch

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 2 c. Lemon Juice
  • 2 c. Orange Juice
  • 2 c. Granulated Sugar
  • 2 c. Water
  • 4 quarts Ginger Ale

instructions:

Combine juices, sugar and water in a large bowl. Let stand 30 minutes.

When ready to serve, add ginger ale.

NOTES:

Serving variation: Pour juice over ice in tall glass until 1/2 full. Fill to top with ginger ale.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Sunday, April 1, 2018

Vintage Recipe: Swiss Steak


This recipe for Swiss Steak is a magazine or newspaper clipping that was glued to an index card. It was found in a small red metal recipe file box worn with age. The recipe card is dated “Sept 18 – 48”.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer. We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
Pin it

Swiss Steak

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 1 1/2 lb. Round Steak
  • Flour
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1/8 tsp. Pepper
  • 1/4 c. Bacon Fat
  • 1/2 c. Chopped Onion
  • 1 1/2 c. Canned Tomatoes
  • 1 stalk Celery, diced
  • 1 clove Garlic, peeled and diced

instructions:

Trim the edges of round steak. Pound into both sides of the steak as much flour as it will hold, using a mallet or the side of a plate. 1 tsp. salt and 1/8 tsp pepper should be combined with the flour.

Heat in a heavy skillet bacon fat and onion. Brown the beef in the fat quickly.

Add tomatoes, celery and garlic.

Cover tightly and bake in a slow oven of 275 degrees F for 2 to 2 1/2 hours or until tender. Uncover for last half hour to thicken sauce.

Thicken gravy with flour if necessary.

Remove steak to hot platter and serve over and around it.

NOTES:

Original printed recipe is glued to an index card and dated September 18, 1948
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, March 15, 2018

Vintage Recipe: Aunt Sue's Coffee Cake

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


Aunt Sue’s Coffee Cake is a sour cream coffee cake that is layered with a cinnamon walnut filling and baked in a Bundt pan. It sounded so wonderful I had to make it. Lucky for me, it tastes as good as it sounds!



I made this recipe exactly as written. The Bundt pan was almost TOO full! I initially baked it for 50 minutes but wound up baking for the whole 60 minutes allotted for in the recipe.


This recipe would have gotten 4 thumbs up except my picky kid decided he needed more cinnamon and said it was only “okay” as it was. For the record, I’m not sure he’s had coffee cake before this so he might have been expecting something closer to cinnamon rolls.



The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer.

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
Pin it

Aunt Sue's Coffee Cake

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:

Cake Batter
  • 3 c. Flour
  • 1 1/2 c. Granulated Sugar
  • 3 Eggs
  • 3/4 c. Butter (or margarine)
  • 16 oz. Sour Cream
  • 1 1/2 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 1 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 1/4 tsp. Salt
Filling
  • 1/2 c. Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 c. Walnuts, chopped
  • 1/2 tsp. Cinnamon

instructions:

In a large bowl, combine the ingredients for the cake batter.

In a smaller bowl, combine the ingredients for the filling mixture.

Pour half of batter into greased Bundt pan.

Sprinkle 1/2 of filing mix over batter.

Add remaining filling mix and then top with the last of the batter.

Bake at 350° F for 45 to 60 minutes.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, March 1, 2018

Homemade Baking Mix


If you don’t have any Bisquick on hand, or if you prefer not to use ready-made mixes, OR if you’re like me and just don’t use it often enough to justify buying a box, you can quickly whip up a batch of this Homemade Baking Mix and substitute it wherever a recipe calls for Bisquick. I’ve used this recipe for several years and have been very pleased with it. It comes together quickly and works great! And I can still make all my favorite childhood recipes from my Bisquick Cookbook!
Pin it

Homemade Baking Mix (Bisquick Copycat)

Use this mix in place of Bisquick in your favorite Bisquick recipes.
Find more recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 4 c. All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 tsp. Baking Powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Salt
  • 1 c. Shortening

instructions:

Combine the flour, baking powder and salt in a bowl. Mix well.

Add shortening and cut into the dry mixture using a pastry blender (you can also use a mixture). Mix until the mixture is blended well and resembles coarse sand.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Monday, February 19, 2018

Avoiding China Pattern Overload

I inherited my parents' wedding china. Mr. LH inherited his grandmother's silver.

The china has a platinum band on it and the majority of the silver is gold plated. They don't match, but I love them both...as well as the history and memories they hold. Looking at all the china patterns available, both active and discontinued, makes me wonder...

"How on earth do people settle for one china pattern when choosing their wedding china?"


They are all so beautiful! I feel quite lucky to have inherited a set. It saves me the dilemma of having to choose.

Contemporary China by Noritake - Footed Cups and Saucers in the Marywood Pattern #2181

But I guess if you couldn't choose just one, you could be like my dear auntie who would mix and match place settings that she found in thrift stores and consignment shops. The sets didn't cost her much so she didn't fret so much about breaking pieces.

They soon became her "everyday dishes" rather than "special occasion only" dishes. Yes, they were more "worn" looking, but that made them more beautiful. With such an assortment of china, guests could choose the china pattern they wanted to use as their "personal place setting" when they visited.

Noritake China Sugar Bowl in the Hermitage Pattern #6226
It's sometimes hard to move away from the more traditional complete matchy-match china sets. But having many different place settings, though it may seem eclectic to some, is certainly one way to personally enjoy a wide assortment of the china patterns available to us.

If you need to complete your set, create a new one, or start your own mis-matched china set, visit our Etsy shop to see the vintage china patterns we have available.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, February 1, 2018

Vintage Recipe: Fantasy Fudge (with Marshmallow Creme)

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen.


This recipe for Fantasy Fudge was found mixed up in a modest collection of recipes dating back to the 1940s. Whip up a batch of this tasty fudge for your sweetheart this Valentine's Day!

The age of this particular recipe card is unknown. It was handwritten in beautiful script on an index card.


Although there are very few ingredients, we did not have all of them on hand when we tried this recipe. So we made a few substitutions:
  • We don’t usually buy margarine so we uses salted butter instead.
  • Instead of evaporated milk, we used heavy cream.
  • The chocolate chips were a combination of several different half empty bags. We wound up with a combination of milk chocolate, semi-sweet and bittersweet chips.
  • Normally if a recipe doesn’t specify, I reach for walnuts to put in cookies and fudge. However, my son has become very vocal lately about his distaste for walnuts so we used pecans in this recipe instead.
  • We used a store brand Marshmallow Creme (Kroger).Turned out great!
This fudge turned out beautifully! It set nicely, cut easily and tasted wonderful! We easily gave it FOUR THUMBS UP!!!

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer. We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.

Yield: Approximately 3 poundsPin it

Fantasy Fudge

Find more vintage recipes at www.littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 3 c. Sugar
  • 3/4 c. Margarine
  • 2/3 c. Evaporated Milk
  • 1 package Chocolate Chips (12 oz)
  • 1 jar Marshmallow Creme (7 oz)
  • 1 cup Chopped Nuts
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla Extract

instructions:

Spray 13 x 9" pan with Pam.

Combine sugar, margarine and milk in saucepan. Bring to full rolling boil, stirring constantly. Continue to boil at medium heat for 5 minutes stirring constantly (scorches easily).

Remove from heat. Stir in chocolate chips until melted. Add marshmallow creme, nuts and vanilla. Beat til well blended. Pour into 13 x 9" pan.

NOTES:

Although there are very few ingredients, we did not have all of them on hand when we tried this recipe. So we made a few substitutions:

- We don’t usually buy margarine so we uses salted butter instead.
- Instead of evaporated milk, we used heavy cream.
- The chocolate chips were a combination of several different half empty bags. We wound up with a combination of milk chocolate, semi-sweet and bittersweet chips.
- We used pecans
- We used a store brand Marshmallow Creme (Kroger)
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.