Friday, December 8, 2017

Vintage Recipe - Sausage Cheese Puffs

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


Looking at this recipe for Sausage Cheese Puffs I am almost certain it is the Bisquick Sausage Ball recipe my best friend and I would make every Christmas. It is SO GOOD! I would always use half spicy and half mild pork sausage as well as sharp cheddar cheese. The resulting sausage balls are not spicy but they have SO MUCH FLAVOR! These are always a welcome addition at a potluck or party!

Mine needed a bit longer to bake than this recipe states. My first sheet baked for 20 minutes. The second sheet for 18 minutes.



This recipe was handwritten on both sides of an index card. It was found in an old large recipe file box. The age of the recipe card is unknown.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer.

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
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Sausage Cheese Puffs

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 1 lb Sausage
  • 3 c. Baking Mix (like Bisquick or Homemade Baking Mix)
  • 4 c. Cheese, shredded
  • 3/4 c. Water

instructions:

Cook and crumble sausage. Drain well.

Combine baking mix and cheese. Add sausage. Add water and toss with a fork.

Shape into 1 1/2" balls.

Place 2" apart on an ungreased baking sheet.

Bake at 400° F for 12 to 15 minutes until puffed and golden.

NOTES:

Cooked Sausage Cheese Puffs may be frozen and then reheated in a 425° oven for 7-9 minutes
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Friday, December 1, 2017

Vintage Recipe: Swedish Spritz Cookies

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen.


The Christmas Season is well known for it’s seemingly endless supply of cookies. Spritz Cookies are on favorite among many. They have a rich buttery shortbread-like texture and a pleasant almond flavor. They are also known as Swedish Butter Cookies when made with vanilla extract.

“Spritz” is German for “spritzen” which means “to squirt”. It seems an appropriate name because you will need a cookie press to make these cookies. If you do not have a cookie press, you can use a pastry bag fitted with a large star tip.

The following three recipes for Spritz Cookies were all handwritten on index cards. They were found together in an old large recipe file box. All the recipes have almond extract in them but you can substitute vanilla extract instead for a rich butter cookie.

The ages of the recipe cards are unknown. The original recipes have been scanned and are transcribed below. They can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer. 

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.

Pin it

Swedish Spritz (Cookies)

Find more vintage recipes at www.littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 1 Cup Butter
  • 3/4 Cup Granulated Sugar (1 1/4 Cups)
  • 1 Egg (2)
  • 1 tsp. Almond Extract or Vanilla Extract (2 tsp)
  • 2 3/4 Cups Flour (4 1/4 Cups)
  • 1/4 tsp Salt (1/4 tsp)
  • 1/2 tsp. Baking Powder (3/4 tsp)
  • 2/3 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 3 Egg Yolks
  • 1 tsp. Almond Extract or Vanilla Extract
  • 2 1/4 Cups Flour

instructions:


  1. Cream butter and sugar together.
  2. Add egg yolks one at a time and beat after each one.
  3. Add extract and flour.
  4. Put through a Cookie Press.
  5. Bake at 350˚ for 20 minutes.
Created using The Recipes Generator



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Spritz

Find more vintage recipes at www.littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 1 Cup Shortening (1 1/2 Cups)
  • 3/4 Cup Granulated Sugar (1 1/4 Cups)
  • 1 Egg (2)
  • 1 tsp. Almond Extract or Vanilla Extract (2 tsp)
  • 2 3/4 Cups Flour (4 1/4 Cups)
  • 1/4 tsp Salt (1/4 tsp)
  • 1/2 tsp. Baking Powder (3/4 tsp)

instructions:


  1. Combine all ingredients
  2. Add egg yolks one at a time and beat after each one.

NOTES:

This particular recipe card had adjustments made to it. The ingredients have the original measurement with the adjusted measurement beside it in parentheses.
Created using The Recipes Generator



Pin it

Spritz (Cookies)

Find more vintage recipes at www.littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 2 Cups Shortening
  • 1/2 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 TBS Almond Extract
  • 5 1/2 Cups Flour
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 1 tsp. Baking Powder

instructions:

Combine all ingredients. Put through a cookie press. Bake at 375˚ for 8-10 minutes.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Sunday, November 12, 2017

Vintage Recipe: Ohio Buckeyes

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


Today’s vintage recipes is Ohio Buckeyes. These sweet treats are called “Buckeyes” because they look like buckeye nuts. The peanut buttery center is coated in a chocolate shell leaving a small opening in the top.

I’ve been making buckeyes for at least a couple decades. It’s a favorite around the holidays when we give ourselves permission to indulge a bit. Although this version calls for crunchy peanut butter and margarine, my family likes them best when made with creamy peanut butter (pictured above) and butter.

To make dipping easier, allow the peanut butter balls to chill in the freezer before dipping them in the chocolate. They seem to stay on the toothpick a little better. If desired (and to achieve a more “authentic” buckeye look), the holes left from the toothpicks can be smoothed over after dipping.



The recipe was handwritten on both sides of an index card. It was found in an old large recipe file box. The age of the recipe card is unknown. It has been scanned and transcribed below and can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!


Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer.

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
Pin it

Ohio Buckeyes

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients

Filling
  • 1 1/2 c. chunky peanut butter (can also use creamy peanut butter if desired)
  • 1 1/2 lbs. powdered sugar, sifted
  • 2 sticks margarine (or butter), softened
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Vanilla Extract
Coating
  • Chocolate Bark (the kind used for candy/dipping)

instructions

Mix filling ingredients together well.

Shape into balls about 1 1/2" diameter.

Melt chocolate bark in a double boiler.

Stick a toothpick into each ball and dip into chocolate, leaving an uncoated circle on top to resemble a buckeye.

Set on wax paper and allow chocolate to harden.  Can also be frozen.

NOTES:

Freezing or refrigerating the peanut butter balls before dipping helps to keep them from falling off the toothpick.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Vintage Recipe: Chocolate Sauce

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen.


This chocolate sauce would be perfect poured over ice cream or a slab of pound cake! You can also use it as a dip for vanilla wafers or fresh fruit. Yum!

The recipe was handwritten on an index card. It was found in an old large recipe file box. The age of the recipe card is unknown.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer.

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
Pin it

Chocolate Sauce

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 3 squares Baking Chocolate
  • 1 stick Butter
  • 1 large can evaporated milk
  • 2 1/2 to 3 c. Granulated Sugar
  • Vanilla

instructions:

Blend together sugar, salt and spices. Add to pumpkin. Add beaten eggs. Stir in hot milk.

Pour into unbaked 9" pie crust.

Bake at 425° F until filling is set, 15 minutes. Bake 30 minutes longer.


Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Vintage Recipe: Peanut Butter Cookies - Large Batch Recipe from Denver Public Schools

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


This recipe for Peanut Butter Cookies makes a HUGE batch…a whopping 7 dozen cookies! The recipe comes from Denver Public Schools and was handwritten on a decorative recipe card. The age of the recipe card is unknown, however, I’m pretty sure it’s been a long time since cookies were made from scratch in school cafeterias!


I was excited to try this recipe because I love love LOVE peanut butter cookies. And since this was a public school recipe, well…one thing school cafeterias always got right back in the day were desserts. However… The results were a bit disappointing. The cookie dough was super dry and crumbly…even before being shaped and baked.


I checked the recipe and checked it again thinking perhaps I missed something. Maybe I misread something. Then I thought maybe the dough was SUPPOSED to be that way…so I continued on. I could barely make the crisscross design on the cookies without them falling apart.


And after baking, the resulting cookie just made me NEED a glass of milk to wash it down. Nice peanut buttery taste but SO DRY!


So I started over. This time stopping at 5 cups of flour.

See how the dough looks much more workable?


I could easily scoop (just over a 1 TBS measuring spoon per cookie), roll them into balls and flatten them with the crisscross pattern.



This batch of cookies was MUCH better! They were still on the crumbly side (I prefer my peanut butter cookies to have some chew), but my 17 year old devoured 5 of them as soon as he came home so I guess that means they pass.

I think perhaps they may be even better if the quantities of shortening and peanut butter were switched. And maybe a teaspoon of vanilla added…but then that makes it a whole new recipe, doesn’t it?


The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. The “recipe notes” section mentions the reduction of flour to 5 cups. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer.

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.

Yield: 7 DozenPin it

Peanut Butter Cookies - Large Batch Recipe

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com
prep time: 15 minscook time: 15 minstotal time: 30 mins

ingredients


  • 1 1/2 c. Peanut Butter
  • 1 c. Brown Sugar, packed
  • 1/2 c. Granulated Sugar
  • 2 c. Shortening
  • 3 Eggs, well beaten
  • 6 c. Flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Baking Powder

instructions

Cream together peanut butter, shortening and sugars.

Add well beaten eggs.

Mix and sift dry ingredients together. Combine with first ingredients.

Dip with #40 scoop (1 1/2 Tbs.) onto #5300 pans (a regular cookie sheet is fine).

Flatten with fork or meat hammer.

Bake at 350° F for 15 minutes.

NOTES:

The original recipe calls for a #40 scoop and a #5300 pan.

- A #40 scoop is equivalent to 1 1/2 Tbs or a well rounded Tablespoon.
- I believe the #5300 pan refers to the size, though I have not been able to determine the exact size. Perhaps it is a jelly roll size (14 x 24") or a full sheet pan (16" x 26")

When making this, I found 6 cups of flour to be WAY too much and preferred it with only 5 cups of flour. I was able to make just under 6 dozen cookies with this change.

I think perhaps the cookies may be even better if the quantities of shortening and peanut butter were switched and a teaspoon of vanilla added.
Created using The Recipes Generator
The original recipe called for baking the cookies for 15 minutes. I experimented with cooking for less time (remember, I prefer chewy cookies) but the 15 minute bake time really produced the best tasting cookie of the bunch.

* The cookies were baked on “AirBake” style baking sheets on a layer of parchment paper. I really like this type of pan because it provides a more even bake. The bottoms of my cookies don’t burn before the tops are done. If you don’t have an AirBake pan, you can try layering or nesting 2 cookie sheets together.





DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Furry Meet Up in Arvada


The day after we returned from our whirlwind trip to South Dakota, there was a Furry gathering in Arvada that The Girl wanted to attend. She had spend so much time making her fursuit but had little chance to actually wear it so we agreed to take her. I'm so glad we did!

She was able to see old friends, make some new friends and had a genuinely wonderful time!





DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Sunday, August 13, 2017

From Colorado to South Dakota


The start of school was creeping up on us quickly (as it always does). We had kept pretty busy all summer and had not yet taken an excursion away from the city.

When we first moved to Colorado, The Boy had mentioned wanting to visit Mount Rushmore. It was, after all, only a 5 or 6 hour drive from Denver.

So on Monday Mr. LH proposes a trip to Mount Rushmore...

Me: When do you want to go?
Mr. LH: I don't know...after the (school) open house Wednesday night.
Me: How long do you want to stay?
Mr. LH: Probably just overnight.

On Tuesday...

Me: Why are the hotels so expensive right now? And why is everyone booked?!? (The Sturgis Rally was in its second week.)
Me: (makes hotel reservations for one night)
Mr. LH: Maybe we can make a trip out to the Badlands, too.
Me: Ooohhh...there is a Minuteman Missile Silo we can go down, too. But you have to make reservations ahead of time.

(10 minutes later)

Me: No openings for the silo tour. (There were no openings for the tour through the entire weekend...make your reservation FAR in advance)

On Wednesday...

Mr. LH: We can take this route through Custer State Park. It's supposed to be really scenic. (It was)
Me: How are we going to drive up there, do all this, and come home in 2 days? We should probably see if we can stay another night.
Mr. LH: ....
Me: (extends hotel reservation to second night)

On Wednesday, we shopped for snacks for the road, packed our stuff, took The Girl to her open house (she is starting her freshman year of high school), and went to bed intending to be out the door at 7 AM (you know that didn't happen, right?)

We pulled out of the driveway sometime after 8am and headed north on I-25 toward Cheyenne. I couldn't help but notice that the scenery from northern Colorado through southeastern Wyoming and southwestern Nebraska looked very much the same...


Of course, just like the Rocky Mountains, the Black Hills seem to suddenly appear! And they are gorgeous!

It took us about 6 hours to reach Mount Rushmore with rest stops and occasional rain.

Mount Rushmore, South Dakota: Since time was not on our side, we decided to head straight to Mount Rushmore instead of going to the hotel first. We arrived around 3pm but the park is open late so that wasn't a big deal. There was a crowd going in even at that time of day! There is a $10 Parking Fee but if you're planning to stay in the area longer than we were, the parking pass is good for the next 7 days.

Looking at all the license plates on the cars, it seemed the entire country and a good portion of Canada was represented in that parking lot!

Coco, The Girl's plush ferret, always vacations with us.
We took the Presidential Trail that ran below the monument and in a big loop. I highly recommend doing this if you can, though there are lots of stairs.



Keystone, South Dakota: Our hotel was in Keystone so we wandered the small town and had dinner there both nights. The streets were lined with motorcycles from people visiting for the Sturgis Rally.


Had I known BEFORE our trip that the Keystone Historical Museum had an exhibit about Carrie Ingalls Swanzey (little sister Carrie from the Little House book series), we would have made time to visit!

Custer State Park, South Dakota: From Keystone, we took 16A (Iron Mountain Road) down through Custer State Park. We were just going to drive through here and take in the views but we kept stopping to explore and take pictures!


Badlands National Park, South Dakota: It is $20 admission per car, good for 7 days.

We drove down I-90 to the Northeast Entrance and looped around inside the park to the Pinnacles Entrance. Outside the Northeast entrance is a Gas Station/Gift Shop in case you need to fill up before entering the park.


We thought we would be in the car most of the time but there were lots of places to get out, walk around and explore. There were also a lot of "scenic overlook" type spots. Lots of photo opportunities!


Bathrooms are scarce. Bring plenty of water! We actually wound up getting there around 1pm and it was HOT! The Visitor Center has wonderfully cold AC and convenient water fountains with bottle fillers. We refilled ALL our 8 or so water bottles before moving on.


Once we left the Pinnacles Entrance of the Badlands, we headed north to Wall, South Dakota, home of Wall Drug.

Wall Drug: This store has quite an advertising campaign going on up and down I-90. Wall Drug is THE "free ice water store". It's like a mini mall with store after store after store all housed within one building.

We got our free ice water and our souvenir South Dakota Christmas ornament before heading back to Keystone for the night.

Sylvan Lake, Custer State Park, South Dakota: We took 224 to 87 and entered Custer State Park again. This time we entered the fee area. It was $20 admission. Once again, we were just going to drive through so the fee seemed a bit ridiculous. But as it turns out, we spent quite a bit of time in the park...again.


Sylvan Lake was the first place we came to and we had to stop. There was no way we could see this and not stop.  A trail took us around the entire lake.

We could have easily spent a few days in this park!

Wind Cave National Park: Coming out of Custer State Park, we automatically wound up in Wind Cave National Park. Here were sweeping prairies and bison! Lots and lots of bison!


We still had a long 6 hour drive back to Colorado, but we were certainly able to pack a lot into a 2-night stay in South Dakota. There is so much more to see there than we originally thought and we definitely plan to return.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.