Sunday, November 30, 2014

Cathrineholm Enamelware

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



I recently picked up a large set of dark blue Cathrineholm bowls with the recognizable lotus pattern in white circling their tops.


Cathrineholm was founded in Norway in the 1800's as an ironworks. They later began making enameled cookware. Under the direction of Grete Prytz Kittelsen in the 1950's, Cathrineholm began producing a line of serving pieces and cookware that has become highly desirable.

The incredibly popular lotus pattern is credited to Arne Claussen.


Mid-Century modern and Scandinavian pieces appeal to me but while I usually lean more towards Dansk enameled cookware (because of their unusual handles), I'm beginning to feel the pull of Cathrineholm serving pieces with their bold colors and simple patterns.

You can find these Cathrineholm bowls, as well as other kitchen and dining pieces, in our Etsy shop.

Update: These bowls have been sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Sunday, November 23, 2014

The Liberty Pencil Sharpener

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Once in awhile we come across something that becomes a "great mystery" to us. Recently, it was this pencil sharpener:


A hand crank controls two revolving cylindrical steel milling cutters that sharpen the pencils. The crank turns smoothly and the device still works well.


My children, 11 and 14 years old, pounced on the opportunity to sharpen their pencils with this antique. There is a transparent, removable collection receptacle so you can easily see the level of pencil shavings and quickly discard them when necessary.



Obviously, there was no mystery about this being a pencil sharpener. I used old Boston models in school for years and always loved them.

This is a Liberty Pencil Sharpener made by Automatic Pencil Sharpener Company (APSCO) in Chicago, Illinois. Finding out that part was easy. It says all of that on the front of the pencil sharpener.

But finding out more information was difficult. Its' history was the mystery. Searching the vast internet, I uncovered no pictures, no articles, no nothing.

I found plenty of information about the Chicago Pencil Sharpener. My Liberty model appeared to be very similar to the Chicago Pencil Sharpener (which was advertised between 1915 and 1936), but I could find absolutely no information about it anywhere.

There are three patent dates on it bottom of the receptacle:  Jan 9th 1900, May 1<sup>st</sup> 1906 and Jan 1<sup>st</sup> 1907 along with "OTHER U.S. AND FOREIGN PATS PENDING". I am estimating this pencil sharpener to be from about 1914 to 1916 because later patents (those listed on later models of the Chicago model) are not listed on this Liberty model.


Another mystery were these markings on the inside of the leg:



I couldn't even begin to explain what these marks were.

During my search for information, I came across a listing at Early Office Museum of Mechanical Pencil Sharpeners from 1910 - 1919. On that list was the Chicago and Chicago Giant Pencil Sharpeners but no other models by the Automatic Pencil Sharpener Company. I was beginning to wonder if my Liberty sharpener was a prototype, a rare model, or a fake.

I recently send an email off to the curator at Early Office Museum along with a few pictures to see if they had any information they could share with me. They were quick to respond:

Hello,Thank you for calling this sharpener to my attention.  This appears to be identical to the Chicago or the Chicago Giant model; these two differ in the width of the shavings container, and I would need a head-on photo to determine which yours is.  I have never seen this with the Liberty name.  And like you, I can find no reference to it.  The Chicago and Chicago Giant were first marketed in 1915.  Beginning in 1919 or 1920, they also showed a 1919 patent date.  As a result, your Liberty was probably produced during 1915-1920.  Perhaps yours was produced in connection with WWI -- either US entry into the war to secure liberty in 1917 or the Allied victory that secured liberty in 1918. 
Best wishes,
Mark

With that response, it felt nice to have at least a possible history uncovered.

The dimensions of the shavings receptacle are: 1 ¾” W x 2 ½” D x 3 ½”H. I'm fairly certain this makes this model more like the Chicago model rather than the Chicago Giant model.


This Liberty Pencil Sharpener is now available for purchase in our Etsy shop.

UPDATE: This pencil sharpener has been sold.




DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Hello Kitty Addiction

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Did I mention when I was rambling on about Paddington Bear that I also had an addiction to Hello Kitty as a child as well? I did. I still do, though it's not "quite" as bad as it was. Back then (in the 1970's and 1980's) you couldn't find most anything your heart desired with Hello Kitty attached to it. There weren't SANRIO stores at the mall. You could only get stuff like stationary...actually...ONLY stationary...pens, pencils, notepads, pencil sharpeners, stamps and little erasers. And only in special stores.

Perhaps my family just didn't shop at the right stores to purchase anything other than Hello Kitty stationary, but that's all I could find.

Apparently, things were different in Japan. A quick search online will bring up all sorts of vintage Hello Kitty items.I found this Hello Kitty sugar bowl (sugar pot?) that was made in Japan.


The mark on the bottom says © 1976 Sanrio.


I've never seen one before. I may never see another one again. It even has a tiny spoon!


I'm sure as soon as The Girl spots this, she'll plead with me to keep it (she loves Hello Kitty, too).
You can find this Hello Kitty Sugar Bowl along with other vintage kitchen and dining items in our Etsy Shop.

Update: This item has sold but you can find other vintage items available in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Saturday, November 8, 2014

How Peter Started A Search For Paddington

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Peter didn't mean to make me a crazed lunatic. It was completely innocent.

By "Peter", I mean Peter Rabbit (of course).

I found him in a thrift store bin full of jumbled flatware along with one of his mates. (Isn't he cute?)


Then as with most everything I find, I began to do some research...

and when I researched Peter, I discovered this...a Betty Crocker Storybook Dinnerware ad from 1983...

Oneida Storybook Dinnerware Ad 1983

Betty Crocker not only sold the Storybook Dinnerware, but matching flatware as well...Peter Rabbit Flatware and PADDINGTON FLATWARE TOO!!! Oh, and Strawberry Shortcake flatware for any fans out there.

paddington bear youth fork
I was never a Strawberry Shortcake kid (though I sniffed those scented dolls more than any child probably should have) but Paddington was another story! I LOVED Paddington Bear!

I first learned about Paddington when my cousin and I were children. He was three years older than me and had a bunch of the chapter books. He either let me borrow them or I snuck them away to read. I honestly can't remember which.

Paddington and I shared a love of marmalade...sticky, sweet, orangy marmalade. Although I didn't have to worry about it sticking to the fur on my bear paws.

And I envied his big ol' hat...big, floppy and bright yellow (or sometimes red).

Before my second child was even born, I bought him a plush Paddington Bear.

I love Paddington Bear. I want a set of this flatware for myself. It doesn't matter that it is intended for children. I. Want. It. The problem is, Paddington flatware seems to be harder to find than Peter Rabbit Flatware. So now I'm looking. And looking. And looking. That is how Peter made me a crazed lunatic. Looking for something that's hard to find can make you crazy for a bit.

Of course, I could just go to Replacements.com and buy some Paddington flatware for an outrageous amount of money ($20 per piece, anyone?) but that would be too easy (and expensive). I'll look for a bargain first...maybe wait for a co-seller on Etsy to find one somewhere.

Or perhaps I'll get one of the awesome Paddington spoon rings or bracelets made by another Etsy seller, TheBeadLadiesII.

The Peter Rabbit flatware can be found in our Etsy Shop.

UPDATE: The Peter Rabbit flatware has been sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Vintage Tupperware

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Plastic storage containers have been around for a long time. Some are very, very good and some are very, very bad. Some are expensive and some are cheap. Then there are others that fall in between.

My favorite food storage containers (for wet foods and/or refrigerator use) have always been Tupperware brand containers.

My Mom sold Tupperware. She had lots of Tupperware so I grew up surrounded by it. The canisters, the kitchen gadgets, the toys...if it was plastic, chances were, it was Tupperware.

We used Tupperware CONSTANTLY at home! We used it in the kitchen and during playtime...


We even took Tupperware to school...


Now as an adult, I still use Tupperware regularly. However, with the exception of a few pieces, they are all the same ones I used all those many years ago. A lot of the vintage pieces seem to seal more easily than the newer ones. My favorites are the Popsicle makers and the Hamburger patty press and keepers:


My Tupperware pieces are always the ones that survive the freezer and the dishwasher. In some cases, my Tupperware has lasted through decades of use!

One of the BEST things about Tupperware is their LIFETIME WARRANTY:
"Tupperware® Brand products are warranted by Tupperware against chipping, cracking, breaking or peeling under normal non-commercial use for the lifetime of the product. Please call Customer Care toll-free at 1-800-TUPPERWARE for free replacement."
With a solid reputation for quality and a warranty like that, Tupperware pieces are worth every penny.

See all the vintage Tupperware I have available in our Etsy shop.

(For dry food storage, I prefer certain Snapware pieces but Tupperware would still be a close second).



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Saturday, November 1, 2014

Little Golden Books

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



When I became a mother, there were certain things I wanted to provide for my son. Besides a loving home and a close family, I wanted to offer him things that would stimulate his mind. I gravitated mainly towards books.

Of course, the knowledge I drew upon was from my own childhood and the books I read. I still remembered all those stories from long ago and wanted my child to experience them as I had.

I still had several of the books that I read as a child but they were mostly for an independent reader and not for a very young child. I slowly began to fill in the gaps and create a children's home library.

Richard Scarry books and the "I Can Read" books quickly became ideal gifts from family members. I began to search out and collect Little Golden Books.


The first five I purchased were brand new reprints of my most favorite (and possible the most popular) Little Golden Books - The Poky Little PuppyThe Tawny Scrawny LionThe Saggy Baggy Elephant, Scuffy the Tugboat and Tootle.

I read all of these, and many other Little Golden Books, as a child. I read them to my own children when they were young. And I still love to read them today. I find myself flipping through the pages of random Little Golden Books, completely in another world, while I'm browsing used book stores.

I get such joy from hearing my youngest child, my daughter who is now eleven years old, squeal with delight when she sees me bring home a new Little Golden Book (even though she pretends she's much too old for such things). And just like her mom, she'll stop everything and read it...even if is a story she has already read many times before.

You can find Little Golden Books and other vintage children's books in our Etsy shop.




DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.