Friday, October 31, 2014

Tough Decisions

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



There comes a time in life for all of us when we have to make tough decisions.  Some of those decisions can be really difficult and life-changing. I have had my share of those moments...and I still question some of the decisions I finally made.

Nowadays, the decision-making moments are becoming much more frequent (though thankfully not nearly as serious). Decisions like what to keep and what to sell.

I mean, take this red enameled butter warmer.


Yes, it's chipped and probably not usable for it's original purpose, but look at it in another setting...


It's quite charming simply handing by it's handle holding my fresh-cut basil. Now I can imagine it as a flower vase in a guest room. In fact, I like it so much I wonder if I should keep it...

And these copper coated measuring cups...


Although I never could figure out their exact origin and age, it took me several months to decide to go ahead and sell them. I would have been happy simply letting them decorate my kitchen walls.

Here is another enameled piece.


It's the only piece of mid-century Dansk Kobenstyle enamelware that I own. The handles are what attracted me to it. I'd love to acquire more pieces (the turquoise would be lovely). I've had this one for awhile now and haven't used it much, but I can't bring my self to part with it.

Sometimes the decisions regarding what to keep and what to let go can be very difficult indeed.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, October 30, 2014

3 Apples High

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



From Left to Right: "You're A KNOCKOUT", "Reach out and touch someone...ME!" and "I'm AIMING for your heart"
I was a watcher of the smurf cartoon in the 80's. In fact, I can still hear a smurf voice calling "Papa Smurf! Papa Smurf!" (I think it was Brainy Smurf, whose mannerisms remind me somewhat of Squidward from the Spongebob cartoons.)

Telephone Smurf - Smurf-A-Gram
If I remember correctly, Smurfs are supposed to be three apples high. That seems a little creepy to me...though are we talking crab-apple height or honeycrisp apple height? I think I would be more comfortable with smurfs that are three cherries high. Regardless, I've always liked the smurfs.

Amour Smurf - Smurf-A-Gram
I used to have a handful of them when I was a kid...Vanity Smurf, Handy Smurf, Brainy Smurf and of course Smurfette, among others.

Boxing Smurf - Smurf-A-Gram
It brought a smile to my face to find these familiar blue beings. They are Smurf-A-Grams and are currently available in our Etsy Shop. They're a great way to say "hello" to someone you care about!

Update: These items have sold but you can find other vintage items available in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Monday, October 27, 2014

The Foley Food Mill

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



The Foley Food Mill is like a cross between a food processor and a blender, minus the electricity. It is an invaluable tool during canning season and is ideal for off-grid settings.


The Foley food mill acts as a manual hand cranked ricer, strainer and masher in one. It is the perfect tool for pureeing fruits and veggies and will even remove seeds and skins for you (something neither the blender nor the food processor will do).


The Foley Food Mill works with soft or cooked foods and makes wonderful applesauce, mashed potatoes, tomato sauce, cauliflower mash and even homemade baby food (THAT would save a lot of money!). I even heard of someone using it to make chili sauce because the chili seeds can’t get through the holes. Brilliant!

There is a wire on the bottom that scrapes the perforated grate clean as it turns. The whole mashing/pureeing mechanism unscrews easily for washing.


Two metal pot rest tabs help to hold the food mill steady and in place while you are using it.


The mashing mechanism turns easily and reads, "To clean - Remove thumb screw - Lift out masher - Food Mill - Foley Mfg Co, MPLS Minn".


On this version, possibly from the 1950's, both the handle and the knob are of a black plastic (believed to be Bakelite) and makes the food mill very comfortable to use.

You can find this Foley Food Mill along with other vintage kitchen items in our Etsy Shop.

We also have a Foley Food Mill available with the all metal handle which is also quite comfortable to use and reads FOOD MILL by Foley  on the handle base.


UPDATE: Both of these food mills have sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Friday, October 24, 2014

Vintage Apron Sewing Patterns

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Aprons are one of my "things". I don't have a shoe fetish, but I do have an apron fetish (and maybe a boot fetish, but that's best saved for a later post).

I think it all started when I realized I had an incredible talent for getting grease spots on my clothes every time I stepped into the kitchen. Even washing dishes would mess up my clothes.

I wasn't always so accurate with my grease splatters. Back in my restaurant working years I could spend the whole morning prepping food and finish up just as clean as could be! So with my new found talent, my appreciation for aprons began.

"I'm just in it for the fashion!"

It started out of practicality. I used aprons that were as plain as could be, as long as they covered a LOT of my clothes. But then my best friend and I started looking at aprons as some sort of fashion statement. I need an apron to hang out the laundry, another one to collect the garden harvest, and many aprons always on hand for working in the kitchen (with a few spares for the children or any guests that want to pitch in and help).

While I still prefer the more practical utilitarian aprons, my best friend favors the more colorful and frilly aprons - especially those that remind her of the "June Cleaver" days.

With these sewing patterns, we could supply everyone we know in a fashionable (yet practical) apron so they'll never have to leave the house only to find they've acquired yet another grease spot.


From Left To Right (starting with the earliest):
  • McCall's 1712 - Child's Cobbler Apron with Tic-Tac-Toe Game - Printed Pattern with Transfer - Size 4 (copyright 1952) Update: This item has sold
  • McCall's 1713 - Misses' Cobbler Apron - Printed Pattern with Transfer - Size Small (10 - 12) (copyright 1952) Update: This item has sold
  • McCall's 3063 -  Misses' Set of Aprons, Plus Bonus Man's Apron - Step-By-Step Pattern - Size Large (16-18) (copyright 1971) Update: This item has sold

From Left To Right:
  • Kwik-Sew 1215 - Misses' Aprons (sizes S, M, L and XL), Child's Aprons (sizes XS, S, M and L) and Towels (copyright 1983) - It looks like there is a long-sleeved child-sized artist's smock in this bunch! Update: This item has sold
  • Simplicity Crafts 9143 - Set of Aprons (sizes S, M and L) (copyright 1989) Update: This item has sold
You can find these and other vintage sewing patterns in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, October 23, 2014

Compco Metal 8mm Motion Picture Film Reels and Cans

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart




They used to hold someone's home movies from the 1950's, but now these two empty Compco motion picture film reels and their metal storage canisters would be perfect vintage decor for a home theater!


The 6" reels used to hold 300 ft of 8mm film.


There are no apparent dings or dents and the cases and reels are still shiny and clean.


Originally from the Compco Corporation, Chicago, Illinois.


Hang them on a wall or display them on a shelf. They could even be used a props in your own home movies (student films, anyone?).

These film reels and canisters are available for purchase from our Etsy shopUpdate: This item has sold but you can find other vintage items available in our Etsy shop!

We also have a pair of smaller Brumberger Cases with a single film reel available. Update: The Brumberger reels have sold



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Ribbed Glass Refrigerator Water Pitcher

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Remember these?


I sure do. That just gives you a hint at my age.

It's a ribbed glass refrigerator water pitcher. I remember these in homes everywhere. As a child I learned to pour water (or sometimes juice) very carefully simply because the container was glass. I don't think I'd would have let my own children try their hand at self-serving themselves with one of these.

Now that the kids are a bit older (and now that I'm a little less uptight) I think we can mature a bit and use cool looking refrigerator pitchers like this one.


 The glass is really thick and has an area specifically designed as a handle. There are no apparent scuffs and no chips or cracks. It really is in fantastic shape for it's age! The aqua/turquoise plastic cap screws on and has a flip-open spout that works just as well now as it should have back in the day. It opens easily and snaps tightly shut (though I haven't checked to see if it's leak-proof. I have a feeling the answer to that one is "no").


I have no clue who made these. There are no manufacturer/maker marks on it. Only a lone "3" on the base.


I know Anchor Hocking made some glasses with the same (or similar) texture but I can't find proof of who made this pitcher. No matter, I still love it!

Dimensions: Approximately 8.25" H, x 5" W x 3" D

You can purchase this Ribbed Glass Refrigerator Pitcher from our Etsy shop.

UPDATE: This pitcher has been sold but you can find more exciting vintage items in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Tupperware Burger Press and Keeper Set

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Of all our Tupperware, my family uses the vintage burger press and keepers the most. They are perfect for taking advantage of sales or making double recipes of burger patties. And don’t just think they’re for hamburgers or turkey burgers. They work perfectly with black bean burgers, too!

Well, right about the time our burger keeper stash numbered around 50, my husband gently suggested we start selling any additional sets we may find...starting with this one.

Tupperware 12 Piece Burger Press and Keeper Set
Included in this 12 piece set are the following pieces:
  • 8 burger keepers - #882
  • 2 burger keeper lids - #215
  • 1 burger press - #884
  • 1 burger press ring - #883

You can find this Tupperware Burger Press and Keeper Set in our Etsy shop.

If you are lucky enough to have a Tupperware burger press and keeper set, you'll need more burger keepers. I am of the opinion that you can never have too many of these – especially if you have a deep freezer available!

UPDATE: This particular set has been sold, however, whenever we come across extra burger keepers and lids (because the lids are a bear to find!), we offer them for sale in our Etsy shop.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Monday, October 20, 2014

General Electric Alarm Clock Model 7369

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart





When I spotted this familiar sight on a shopping excursion, I almost squealed with delight.

Almost.

I really don't understand why. Me and alarm clocks are like oil and water. It could simply be that I spent many of my childhood years with this clock's likeness on my own nightstand.


This is a General Electric Alarm Clock, model 7369. It's so easy to set up and use that I didn't even need a 50-page instruction booklet like the ones that come with those new fandangled alarm clocks. You know, the ones with too many bells and whistles and the snooze button that lets you oversleep...

Ahem.


There is no snooze button on this baby. There is also no soothing-wake-you-up-gently-music. There is only a single-volume buzzer for the alarm. When this alarm clock buzzes you awake (and it WILL buzz you awake), you MUST wake up after turning the buzzer off. It only takes one time of waking up late to get used to this.

You can find this and other vintage items for sale in our Etsy shop.

UPDATE: This item has sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Sunday, October 19, 2014

Vintage Ekco Flint Sauce Ladle

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



One of the hard parts about loving what we sell is simply that I just don't want to see a lot of the pieces go.

But we can't keep everything we find! There is a LOT of history and it won't all fit in my house!

So here is one of the most recent but-it-doesn't-take-up-THAT-much-space items I have to let go to someone else's kitchen. It's a vintage Ekco Flint 2 ounce sauce ladle. It's from the 1960's or 1970's.


This smaller 2-ounce size would be perfect for those smaller tasks - serving portion sized helping of sauces, ladling punch into tiny Dixie cups or putting up small jars of preserves and jellies.

The stainless steel part of the handle has "Flint Stainless Steel" and an arrowhead stamped in it.


There are no signs of rust or corrosion anywhere and the pattern on the plastic (melamine?) handle is still quite crisp and clean. I see no visible chips, nicks or cracks in the handle. Obviously, these pieces outlast their modern counterparts.


I keep seeing this pattern being referred to as "Harvest Wheat" but I don't know for sure if it was actually called that.

Besides this 2 oz ladle, there were at least 13 other pieces that I am aware of that make up the full set:
  • short carving fork
  • long fork
  • spatula
  • jumbo spatula
  • large ladle
  • serving spoon
  • large spoon
  • slotted spoon
  • flat spreader/icing spatula
  • offset spreader/icing spatula
  • potato masher
  • strainer
  • dessert server

It was estimated that by the late 1950's Ekco Products produced about 65% of all the kitchen tools used and about 40 percent of the kitchen and table cutlery. In the 1960's, Ekco Products was trading under the name of Flint (as well as many other trade names) and continued to do so into the 1970's.

I may have to build out my own personal set of these vintage pieces myself.

You can find this ladle and other vintage kitchen items at my Etsy shop.

UPDATE: This item has sold, but you can find more great vintage items in our Etsy Shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Saturday, October 18, 2014

Sweet, Delicate Annabelle

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Isn't this china pattern just as sweet as can be?


 It's called "Annabelle" by Noritake. I love the way it graces the top of this sugar bowl...the delicate white flowers and the grey and green leaves.


It reminds me of the scene in Little Women (1994 version) where Jo's little sister, Amy, is sitting under the trees by her dear Aunt March painting china. (At least that's the way I remember it.)

"Annabelle" is a discontinued pattern (# 6856) manufactured from 1967 to 1978.


This sugar bowl is available in our Etsy shop.

UPDATE: This item has sold, but you can find more great vintage items in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Friday, October 17, 2014

It Looks Like A Spoon, But Is It?

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart


Do you know what this is?


It looks like a spoon, but it isn't.

It's not really fair for me to only show you the back. Take another look.


This tool is commonly mistaken as a spoon used to skim cream off milk. But according to DairyAntiques.com, it is a CreamTop cream separator. It was actually used with Cream Top milk bottles which has a bulb at the top where the cream would collect.

CreamTop Ad
The Separator would be placed at the narrow point between the top bulb and the bottom of the bottle allowing for the cream to be poured off. The curved "handled" end of the separator has a point that was used to remove milk caps. Again, according to DairyAntiques.com, the separators were supplied to licensed dairymen by the Cream Top Bottle Corporation at a cost of 5 cents and were usually given to customers for free.


The Cream Top separator is marked with two patent dates on the handle.  Mar. 3, 1925 is the patent date of the bottle (Patent # US1528480 A) and Sept. 2, 1924 is the patent date for the separator (Patent # US1506752 A).


Of course, you probably won't have a need now days for a cream separator (or for a regular supplier of milk delivered to your door in cream separator bottles) but this little reminder of the past can still function perfectly as a unique sugar spoon. It's quite the conversation starter.

You can find this CreamTop cream separator available for purchase right now in our Etsy shop.

Update: This item has sold but you can find other vintage items available in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, October 16, 2014

Atlas E-Z Seal Pint Lightning Jar

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



I love this jar! I have an incredible attraction to old jars with this wire bail lightning closure. The "lightning closure" design has a glass bubble lid clamped to the top of the jar with a wire bail. The wire is permanently affixed to the neck of the jar and with little effort, the bail will swing up “quick as lightening” to hold the lid in place.

In 1902, The Hazel Glass Company and the Atlas Glass company merged. The resulting Hazel-Atlas Glass Company was in business until 1964. They were one of the leading producers of canning jars in the 30's and 40's.

1911 Atlas E-Z Seal Canning Jar Ad from Good Housekeeping Magazine
1911 Atlas E-Z Seal Canning Jar Ad from Good Housekeeping Magazine
This particular jar is an Atlas E-Z Seal pint sized lightening canning jar.  The jar is clear glass and has lots of bubbles throughout. It's not for canning anymore. There are safer canning jars available nowadays. But this old jar has so much character, it's easy to find a use for it in the home.


“ATLAS E-Z SEAL” is in raised lettering on the front of the jar.

The glass top is aqua and therefore does not appear to be original to the jar. It too reads “E-Z SEAL” and has its share of bubbles in the glass.


The twisted wire bail and lightning closure have some rust on them but the mechanism works smoothly.

The number “8”, the letter “B” and the “H over A” Hazel-Atlas logo are all in raised lettering on the base.


There are some chips on outer top rim of the jar but the inner rim feels smooth.

Dimensions: approximately 5.75" H x 3.5" W x 3.5" D

You can purchase this jar from our Etsy shop.

UPDATE: This item has sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Hermitage by Noritake - Creamer and Sugar Bowl with Lid

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart




I love Noritake china. It could be because my parents' wedding china, now displayed in my own china cabinet, was made by Noritake. Or it could be because some of the patterns, like this one, are so dang cute!

I was thrilled to come across this Noritake creamer and sugar bowl pair. They showcase the gorgeous Hermitage pattern (#6226) manufactured from between 1961 and 1975. The pattern may be over 50 years old but still looks incredibly modern today.


Both the creamer and the sugar bowl are in wonderful condition despite their age. The sugar bowl even has it's lid intact.


You can purchase this pair from our Etsy shop.
  • Pattern: Hermitage by Noritake
  • Pattern #: 6226
  • Description: Birds and Flowers, Green and Tan
  • Pattern Status: Discontinued
  • Pattern Dates: 1961 - 1975
Update: This item has sold but you can find other vintage items available in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Tuesday, October 14, 2014

1974 Geobra Playmobil Construction Figure


This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart




In February 1974, the very first Playmobil products premiered at the Nuremberg International Toy Fair. Only three themes were available at the time, Indians, Knights and Construction.

A Dutch wholesaler placed a large order allowing further development of the toy to continue. By the end of May, 1974, Playmobil sets were on their way to store shelves in both Germany and the Benelux States (The Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg).

This is one of the very first Playmobil figures available in 1974. This particular figure was part of a construction themed set. He comes with his orange hard hat.



You can find this and similar items in our Etsy shop



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.