Sunday, December 28, 2014

DAV State License Plate Keychain Tags

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



I love finding something from half a century ago and learning more about it. This week, that something happened to be a bunch of DAV tags from the Disabled American Veterans Ident-O-Tag program.


From the early 1940’s through the mid 1970’s the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) offered Ident-O-Tags to people through the mail. The tags were keys chains resembling their own personal vehicle’s state license plates.

For a small fee (only 25 cents in the 1940’s), your keys would be registered with the DAV. If the keys were ever lost, a good Samaritan could drop the keys into any mailbox, they would be sent to DAV headquarters and from there be mailed, postage paid, back to the rightful owners.


With all the keys people are still losing, perhaps this program should start up again! You can find DAV Ident-O-Tags and other collectibles in our Etsy shop.

UPDATE: These tags have been sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, December 25, 2014

A Merry Vintage Christmas

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



I love Christmastime. The decorating and caroling. The increased happiness and goodwill. The purchasing or making of gifts specially chosen for each name on my list. Driving through town and seeing all the homes twinkling bright with Christmas lights.


One of my absolute favorites as a child - and one of the few that still has all it's beads still in place.
Most of all, I love the Christmas ornaments. Whether they are mine,  or they belong to someone else, or even if they are still in the store waiting to be bought, Christmas ornaments are special to me. Each one has a story...it could be an old story that has been carried through generations... ...a new story that has only just begun it's annual tradition...
 
The newest ornament to add to the collection...a gift from my best friend in North Carolina who sent this along with Moravian Sugar Cake and Moravian Ginger Cookies...YUM
...or perhaps an older story that has picked up new chapters along the way.

This little lamb ornament was made by my mom when I was a child. When my now-15-year-old son was a toddler, He wanted it and grabbed for it, pulling the Christmas tree down on top of him. Now it's his favorite ornament because of the history it holds.
I  look forward to unpacking the boxes of carefully wrapped Christmas ornaments. Some are from our travels, but most have been made by my children, myself (as a child and adult) and even by my mom many, many, MANY years ago. The children call them "really old" ornaments. I call them "vintage". The children have their favorites, as do I, and there is usually a small argument or two over who gets to hang what ornament on the tree. But eventually, it gets done. Our Christmas tree is a very "handmade" looking tree. It lacks the tinsel and ribbon with coordinating glass balls. Instead, every branch is crammed full of our rather large and varied selection of ornaments.

This angel has adorned the top of my Christmas tree every year for as long as I can remember.
We all stand back and admire it, pointing out all the ornaments and re-telling their stories. You can find vintage Christmas ornaments available for purchase in our Etsy Shop.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Pinback Buttons

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Confession time.

I was one of those eighties kids that had a denim jacket covered in buttons...and I loved it.


Some of the buttons were colorful. Some were sarcastic. Some were just plain cute.


Being a shy, awkward teen, my buttons were an outlet for expressing myself.

Eventually, I moved away from the buttons. They wound up in a box of stuff that I will probably never discard.

I still have fun rummaging through pinback buttons at flea markets, yard sales and thrift stores. They're common but not exactly easy to find. That's probably because people have quite an attachment to their buttons. We were thrilled to find these buttons recently. You can find them and other pinback buttons in our Etsy Shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Vintage Books

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



I love a good book.

Make that "bookS".

I have no fewer than 20 books in and around my nightstand at any given time. The book shelves are all bulging and still I bring home more books. There are at least 25 moving boxes still full of books from our last move 4 years ago (and they have already been weeded through!!!).

You could say I have an obsession with books.

And if it's an old book and I am even more enthralled.

So there was no way I was going to go home without this...

Or this...

Or this...


And many, many, MANY others. Eventually, they may make it to our Etsy shop. They MAY.

Maybe.

And definitely not until after I have already had a chance to read them once or twice.





DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Sunday, November 30, 2014

Cathrineholm Enamelware

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



I recently picked up a large set of dark blue Cathrineholm bowls with the recognizable lotus pattern in white circling their tops.


Cathrineholm was founded in Norway in the 1800's as an ironworks. They later began making enameled cookware. Under the direction of Grete Prytz Kittelsen in the 1950's, Cathrineholm began producing a line of serving pieces and cookware that has become highly desirable.

The incredibly popular lotus pattern is credited to Arne Claussen.


Mid-Century modern and Scandinavian pieces appeal to me but while I usually lean more towards Dansk enameled cookware (because of their unusual handles), I'm beginning to feel the pull of Cathrineholm serving pieces with their bold colors and simple patterns.

You can find these Cathrineholm bowls, as well as other kitchen and dining pieces, in our Etsy shop.

Update: These bowls have been sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Sunday, November 23, 2014

The Liberty Pencil Sharpener

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Once in awhile we come across something that becomes a "great mystery" to us. Recently, it was this pencil sharpener:


A hand crank controls two revolving cylindrical steel milling cutters that sharpen the pencils. The crank turns smoothly and the device still works well.


My children, 11 and 14 years old, pounced on the opportunity to sharpen their pencils with this antique. There is a transparent, removable collection receptacle so you can easily see the level of pencil shavings and quickly discard them when necessary.



Obviously, there was no mystery about this being a pencil sharpener. I used old Boston models in school for years and always loved them.

This is a Liberty Pencil Sharpener made by Automatic Pencil Sharpener Company (APSCO) in Chicago, Illinois. Finding out that part was easy. It says all of that on the front of the pencil sharpener.

But finding out more information was difficult. Its' history was the mystery. Searching the vast internet, I uncovered no pictures, no articles, no nothing.

I found plenty of information about the Chicago Pencil Sharpener. My Liberty model appeared to be very similar to the Chicago Pencil Sharpener (which was advertised between 1915 and 1936), but I could find absolutely no information about it anywhere.

There are three patent dates on it bottom of the receptacle:  Jan 9th 1900, May 1<sup>st</sup> 1906 and Jan 1<sup>st</sup> 1907 along with "OTHER U.S. AND FOREIGN PATS PENDING". I am estimating this pencil sharpener to be from about 1914 to 1916 because later patents (those listed on later models of the Chicago model) are not listed on this Liberty model.


Another mystery were these markings on the inside of the leg:



I couldn't even begin to explain what these marks were.

During my search for information, I came across a listing at Early Office Museum of Mechanical Pencil Sharpeners from 1910 - 1919. On that list was the Chicago and Chicago Giant Pencil Sharpeners but no other models by the Automatic Pencil Sharpener Company. I was beginning to wonder if my Liberty sharpener was a prototype, a rare model, or a fake.

I recently send an email off to the curator at Early Office Museum along with a few pictures to see if they had any information they could share with me. They were quick to respond:

Hello,Thank you for calling this sharpener to my attention.  This appears to be identical to the Chicago or the Chicago Giant model; these two differ in the width of the shavings container, and I would need a head-on photo to determine which yours is.  I have never seen this with the Liberty name.  And like you, I can find no reference to it.  The Chicago and Chicago Giant were first marketed in 1915.  Beginning in 1919 or 1920, they also showed a 1919 patent date.  As a result, your Liberty was probably produced during 1915-1920.  Perhaps yours was produced in connection with WWI -- either US entry into the war to secure liberty in 1917 or the Allied victory that secured liberty in 1918. 
Best wishes,
Mark

With that response, it felt nice to have at least a possible history uncovered.

The dimensions of the shavings receptacle are: 1 ¾” W x 2 ½” D x 3 ½”H. I'm fairly certain this makes this model more like the Chicago model rather than the Chicago Giant model.


This Liberty Pencil Sharpener is now available for purchase in our Etsy shop.

UPDATE: This pencil sharpener has been sold.




DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Hello Kitty Addiction

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Did I mention when I was rambling on about Paddington Bear that I also had an addiction to Hello Kitty as a child as well? I did. I still do, though it's not "quite" as bad as it was. Back then (in the 1970's and 1980's) you couldn't find most anything your heart desired with Hello Kitty attached to it. There weren't SANRIO stores at the mall. You could only get stuff like stationary...actually...ONLY stationary...pens, pencils, notepads, pencil sharpeners, stamps and little erasers. And only in special stores.

Perhaps my family just didn't shop at the right stores to purchase anything other than Hello Kitty stationary, but that's all I could find.

Apparently, things were different in Japan. A quick search online will bring up all sorts of vintage Hello Kitty items.I found this Hello Kitty sugar bowl (sugar pot?) that was made in Japan.


The mark on the bottom says © 1976 Sanrio.


I've never seen one before. I may never see another one again. It even has a tiny spoon!


I'm sure as soon as The Girl spots this, she'll plead with me to keep it (she loves Hello Kitty, too).
You can find this Hello Kitty Sugar Bowl along with other vintage kitchen and dining items in our Etsy Shop.

Update: This item has sold but you can find other vintage items available in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Saturday, November 8, 2014

How Peter Started A Search For Paddington

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Peter didn't mean to make me a crazed lunatic. It was completely innocent.

By "Peter", I mean Peter Rabbit (of course).

I found him in a thrift store bin full of jumbled flatware along with one of his mates. (Isn't he cute?)


Then as with most everything I find, I began to do some research...

and when I researched Peter, I discovered this...a Betty Crocker Storybook Dinnerware ad from 1983...

Oneida Storybook Dinnerware Ad 1983

Betty Crocker not only sold the Storybook Dinnerware, but matching flatware as well...Peter Rabbit Flatware and PADDINGTON FLATWARE TOO!!! Oh, and Strawberry Shortcake flatware for any fans out there.

paddington bear youth fork
I was never a Strawberry Shortcake kid (though I sniffed those scented dolls more than any child probably should have) but Paddington was another story! I LOVED Paddington Bear!

I first learned about Paddington when my cousin and I were children. He was three years older than me and had a bunch of the chapter books. He either let me borrow them or I snuck them away to read. I honestly can't remember which.

Paddington and I shared a love of marmalade...sticky, sweet, orangy marmalade. Although I didn't have to worry about it sticking to the fur on my bear paws.

And I envied his big ol' hat...big, floppy and bright yellow (or sometimes red).

Before my second child was even born, I bought him a plush Paddington Bear.

I love Paddington Bear. I want a set of this flatware for myself. It doesn't matter that it is intended for children. I. Want. It. The problem is, Paddington flatware seems to be harder to find than Peter Rabbit Flatware. So now I'm looking. And looking. And looking. That is how Peter made me a crazed lunatic. Looking for something that's hard to find can make you crazy for a bit.

Of course, I could just go to Replacements.com and buy some Paddington flatware for an outrageous amount of money ($20 per piece, anyone?) but that would be too easy (and expensive). I'll look for a bargain first...maybe wait for a co-seller on Etsy to find one somewhere.

Or perhaps I'll get one of the awesome Paddington spoon rings or bracelets made by another Etsy seller, TheBeadLadiesII.

The Peter Rabbit flatware can be found in our Etsy Shop.

UPDATE: The Peter Rabbit flatware has been sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Vintage Tupperware

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Plastic storage containers have been around for a long time. Some are very, very good and some are very, very bad. Some are expensive and some are cheap. Then there are others that fall in between.

My favorite food storage containers (for wet foods and/or refrigerator use) have always been Tupperware brand containers.

My Mom sold Tupperware. She had lots of Tupperware so I grew up surrounded by it. The canisters, the kitchen gadgets, the toys...if it was plastic, chances were, it was Tupperware.

We used Tupperware CONSTANTLY at home! We used it in the kitchen and during playtime...


We even took Tupperware to school...


Now as an adult, I still use Tupperware regularly. However, with the exception of a few pieces, they are all the same ones I used all those many years ago. A lot of the vintage pieces seem to seal more easily than the newer ones. My favorites are the Popsicle makers and the Hamburger patty press and keepers:


My Tupperware pieces are always the ones that survive the freezer and the dishwasher. In some cases, my Tupperware has lasted through decades of use!

One of the BEST things about Tupperware is their LIFETIME WARRANTY:
"Tupperware® Brand products are warranted by Tupperware against chipping, cracking, breaking or peeling under normal non-commercial use for the lifetime of the product. Please call Customer Care toll-free at 1-800-TUPPERWARE for free replacement."
With a solid reputation for quality and a warranty like that, Tupperware pieces are worth every penny.

See all the vintage Tupperware I have available in our Etsy shop.

(For dry food storage, I prefer certain Snapware pieces but Tupperware would still be a close second).



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Saturday, November 1, 2014

Little Golden Books

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



When I became a mother, there were certain things I wanted to provide for my son. Besides a loving home and a close family, I wanted to offer him things that would stimulate his mind. I gravitated mainly towards books.

Of course, the knowledge I drew upon was from my own childhood and the books I read. I still remembered all those stories from long ago and wanted my child to experience them as I had.

I still had several of the books that I read as a child but they were mostly for an independent reader and not for a very young child. I slowly began to fill in the gaps and create a children's home library.

Richard Scarry books and the "I Can Read" books quickly became ideal gifts from family members. I began to search out and collect Little Golden Books.


The first five I purchased were brand new reprints of my most favorite (and possible the most popular) Little Golden Books - The Poky Little PuppyThe Tawny Scrawny LionThe Saggy Baggy Elephant, Scuffy the Tugboat and Tootle.

I read all of these, and many other Little Golden Books, as a child. I read them to my own children when they were young. And I still love to read them today. I find myself flipping through the pages of random Little Golden Books, completely in another world, while I'm browsing used book stores.

I get such joy from hearing my youngest child, my daughter who is now eleven years old, squeal with delight when she sees me bring home a new Little Golden Book (even though she pretends she's much too old for such things). And just like her mom, she'll stop everything and read it...even if is a story she has already read many times before.

You can find Little Golden Books and other vintage children's books in our Etsy shop.




DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Friday, October 31, 2014

Tough Decisions

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



There comes a time in life for all of us when we have to make tough decisions.  Some of those decisions can be really difficult and life-changing. I have had my share of those moments...and I still question some of the decisions I finally made.

Nowadays, the decision-making moments are becoming much more frequent (though thankfully not nearly as serious). Decisions like what to keep and what to sell.

I mean, take this red enameled butter warmer.


Yes, it's chipped and probably not usable for it's original purpose, but look at it in another setting...


It's quite charming simply handing by it's handle holding my fresh-cut basil. Now I can imagine it as a flower vase in a guest room. In fact, I like it so much I wonder if I should keep it...

And these copper coated measuring cups...


Although I never could figure out their exact origin and age, it took me several months to decide to go ahead and sell them. I would have been happy simply letting them decorate my kitchen walls.

Here is another enameled piece.


It's the only piece of mid-century Dansk Kobenstyle enamelware that I own. The handles are what attracted me to it. I'd love to acquire more pieces (the turquoise would be lovely). I've had this one for awhile now and haven't used it much, but I can't bring my self to part with it.

Sometimes the decisions regarding what to keep and what to let go can be very difficult indeed.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, October 30, 2014

3 Apples High

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



From Left to Right: "You're A KNOCKOUT", "Reach out and touch someone...ME!" and "I'm AIMING for your heart"
I was a watcher of the smurf cartoon in the 80's. In fact, I can still hear a smurf voice calling "Papa Smurf! Papa Smurf!" (I think it was Brainy Smurf, whose mannerisms remind me somewhat of Squidward from the Spongebob cartoons.)

Telephone Smurf - Smurf-A-Gram
If I remember correctly, Smurfs are supposed to be three apples high. That seems a little creepy to me...though are we talking crab-apple height or honeycrisp apple height? I think I would be more comfortable with smurfs that are three cherries high. Regardless, I've always liked the smurfs.

Amour Smurf - Smurf-A-Gram
I used to have a handful of them when I was a kid...Vanity Smurf, Handy Smurf, Brainy Smurf and of course Smurfette, among others.

Boxing Smurf - Smurf-A-Gram
It brought a smile to my face to find these familiar blue beings. They are Smurf-A-Grams and are currently available in our Etsy Shop. They're a great way to say "hello" to someone you care about!

Update: These items have sold but you can find other vintage items available in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Monday, October 27, 2014

The Foley Food Mill

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



The Foley Food Mill is like a cross between a food processor and a blender, minus the electricity. It is an invaluable tool during canning season and is ideal for off-grid settings.


The Foley food mill acts as a manual hand cranked ricer, strainer and masher in one. It is the perfect tool for pureeing fruits and veggies and will even remove seeds and skins for you (something neither the blender nor the food processor will do).


The Foley Food Mill works with soft or cooked foods and makes wonderful applesauce, mashed potatoes, tomato sauce, cauliflower mash and even homemade baby food (THAT would save a lot of money!). I even heard of someone using it to make chili sauce because the chili seeds can’t get through the holes. Brilliant!

There is a wire on the bottom that scrapes the perforated grate clean as it turns. The whole mashing/pureeing mechanism unscrews easily for washing.


Two metal pot rest tabs help to hold the food mill steady and in place while you are using it.


The mashing mechanism turns easily and reads, "To clean - Remove thumb screw - Lift out masher - Food Mill - Foley Mfg Co, MPLS Minn".


On this version, possibly from the 1950's, both the handle and the knob are of a black plastic (believed to be Bakelite) and makes the food mill very comfortable to use.

You can find this Foley Food Mill along with other vintage kitchen items in our Etsy Shop.

We also have a Foley Food Mill available with the all metal handle which is also quite comfortable to use and reads FOOD MILL by Foley  on the handle base.


UPDATE: Both of these food mills have sold.



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Friday, October 24, 2014

Vintage Apron Sewing Patterns

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart



Aprons are one of my "things". I don't have a shoe fetish, but I do have an apron fetish (and maybe a boot fetish, but that's best saved for a later post).

I think it all started when I realized I had an incredible talent for getting grease spots on my clothes every time I stepped into the kitchen. Even washing dishes would mess up my clothes.

I wasn't always so accurate with my grease splatters. Back in my restaurant working years I could spend the whole morning prepping food and finish up just as clean as could be! So with my new found talent, my appreciation for aprons began.

"I'm just in it for the fashion!"

It started out of practicality. I used aprons that were as plain as could be, as long as they covered a LOT of my clothes. But then my best friend and I started looking at aprons as some sort of fashion statement. I need an apron to hang out the laundry, another one to collect the garden harvest, and many aprons always on hand for working in the kitchen (with a few spares for the children or any guests that want to pitch in and help).

While I still prefer the more practical utilitarian aprons, my best friend favors the more colorful and frilly aprons - especially those that remind her of the "June Cleaver" days.

With these sewing patterns, we could supply everyone we know in a fashionable (yet practical) apron so they'll never have to leave the house only to find they've acquired yet another grease spot.


From Left To Right (starting with the earliest):
  • McCall's 1712 - Child's Cobbler Apron with Tic-Tac-Toe Game - Printed Pattern with Transfer - Size 4 (copyright 1952) Update: This item has sold
  • McCall's 1713 - Misses' Cobbler Apron - Printed Pattern with Transfer - Size Small (10 - 12) (copyright 1952) Update: This item has sold
  • McCall's 3063 -  Misses' Set of Aprons, Plus Bonus Man's Apron - Step-By-Step Pattern - Size Large (16-18) (copyright 1971) Update: This item has sold

From Left To Right:
  • Kwik-Sew 1215 - Misses' Aprons (sizes S, M, L and XL), Child's Aprons (sizes XS, S, M and L) and Towels (copyright 1983) - It looks like there is a long-sleeved child-sized artist's smock in this bunch! Update: This item has sold
  • Simplicity Crafts 9143 - Set of Aprons (sizes S, M and L) (copyright 1989) Update: This item has sold
You can find these and other vintage sewing patterns in our Etsy shop!



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Thursday, October 23, 2014

Compco Metal 8mm Motion Picture Film Reels and Cans

This post was originally published on a blog for our Etsy shop, The Peddler's Cart




They used to hold someone's home movies from the 1950's, but now these two empty Compco motion picture film reels and their metal storage canisters would be perfect vintage decor for a home theater!


The 6" reels used to hold 300 ft of 8mm film.


There are no apparent dings or dents and the cases and reels are still shiny and clean.


Originally from the Compco Corporation, Chicago, Illinois.


Hang them on a wall or display them on a shelf. They could even be used a props in your own home movies (student films, anyone?).

These film reels and canisters are available for purchase from our Etsy shopUpdate: This item has sold but you can find other vintage items available in our Etsy shop!

We also have a pair of smaller Brumberger Cases with a single film reel available. Update: The Brumberger reels have sold



DISCLOSURE: This post may contain monetized affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.