Friday, October 12, 2018

Vintage Recipe: Pumpkin Pie Recipe from 1950

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen. 


Pumpkin Pie is definitely a fall favorite. In fact, my family loves it so much that we decided it was no longer “just for Thanksgiving” Pumpkin Pie is so quick and easy to throw together that we have it much more often than just once a year! And it really came in handy when Mr. LH had his wisdom teeth removed...pumpkin pie to the rescue!

This vintage Pumpkin Pie recipe was handwritten in ink on an index card that had been darkened with time. It was found in a small red metal recipe file box worn with age. The original recipe card is dated “10-12-50″so that’s why I’m posting it here on this day, exactly 68 years later.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer. We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.
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Pumpkin Pie

Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 1/2 c. Granulated Sugar
  • 1 tsp. Ginger
  • 1/4 tsp. Cloves
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Cinnamon
  • 1 1/2 c. Pumpkin
  • 1 1/2 c. Hot Milk
  • 9" Pie Crust, unbaked

instructions:

Blend together sugar, salt and spices. Add to pumpkin. Add beaten eggs. Stir in hot milk.

Pour into unbaked 9" pie crust.

Bake at 425° F until filling is set, 15 minutes. Bake 30 minutes longer.


Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Wednesday, September 26, 2018

DIY Taco Seasoning


Several years ago, we began making our own taco seasoning.

Tacos are a regular in our household. Perhaps I should just call them nachos. Put chips in the bottom of a bowl and top with your meat, beans, cheese, lettuce, salsa, sour cream and whatever else you like to add (olives and guacamole are two occasional additions in our household).

When I was little, my family called it "Taco Slop" because it made a big 'ol sloppy mess in your bowl.

Anyway, we have this stuff a lot...at least once a week, and I was constantly running out of the seasoning. I would forget to buy more and the packets just kept getting more and more expensive anyway.

Looking for alternatives, we came across this recipe from AllRecipes.com and have been happily using it for the last 7 years. I believe the original recipe was written for approximately 1 packet size but we just make a big batch and store it in a pint jar in the pantry. In fact, I was just whipping up a batch of taco seasoning this week when I realized I had never posted here about it...so here ya go.


The recipe below makes just over a half pint of mix, what you see pictured here. Just pour all the spices in the jar, cover and shake. Done! We use about a heaping teaspoon to season a pound of meat but you can adjust it to your tastes.




diy taco seasoning, homemade taco seasoning
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Bulk Taco Seasoning

prep time: 5 minscook time: total time: 5 mins

ingredients:


  • 6 T. Chili Powder
  • 3 T. Cumin
  • 2 T. Sea Salt
  • 2 T. Ground Black Pepper
  • 1 T. Paprika
  • 1/2 T. Garlic Powder
  • 1/2 T. Onion Powder
  • 1/2 T. Dried Oregano
  • 1/2 T. Crushed Red Pepper Flakes

instructions:

Combine all ingredients in a pint jar (or a small bowl) and mix together. Cover and store.

NOTES:

Use 1 - 3 T. of mix per pound of ground beef or chicken.

Adapted from original recipe at AllRecipes.com (https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/46653/taco-seasoning-i/)
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Saturday, September 22, 2018

An Anime Birthday (again)


The Girl turned 15 a couple weeks ago. FIFTEEN. She was SEVEN when we moved to Colorado...and that was only a couple years ago, right?

I say this every time one of my children reach a milestone, but "Where has the time gone?"

Every year for their birthday, the "Pickles" make their birthday cake request. I have a lot of the cakes documented on my amateur cake decorator's blog, The Creative Cake Maker...though the blog has been woefully neglected for several years.

So, this is the fifth year The Girl has requested an anime related birthday cake for her birthday.

In 2014, it was a Pokemon cake, so I made a Charmander Tres Leches Cake. Awwww...


In 2015, she was all about Dragonball Z...so she requested a Dragonball Z Cake (surrounded by seven Dragon Balls).


In 2016, It was a Naruto Birthday Cake (look at all that black fondant!!!). The top has the Akatsuki cloud and the sides have the Akatsuki symbols in their respective colors.


Last year, in 2017, it was a cross between Naruto and furries.


This year, One Piece is her newest anime obsession so she requested a One Piece birthday cake. She even helped me put it together and decorate it, which was a first.


Wonder what next year's birthday cake will be...



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Saturday, September 8, 2018

Vintage Recipe: Carol's Corn Casserole

I'm digging into old recipe boxes and rediscovering the family favorites hidden inside! You'll find carefully handwritten recipe cards, newspapers and magazines clippings and even some hastily scrawled directions on scraps of paper, all from years (and years) ago! They're all getting scanned and transcribed so you can enjoy them in your own home kitchen.


Carol’s Corn Casserole uses both creamed corn and whole kernel corn as well as a box of Jiffy Corn Muffin Mix. The recipe also gives instructions for easily increasing the servings of the recipe without having to double the whole thing.


I did not have bread crumbs to use so I substituted crushed Ritz Crackers in place of the buttered bread crumbs. I also did not use the optional sugar in the topping. Ritz Crackers have their own sweetness to them.


If you choose to make this recipe, I suggest using a shallow (2″ or so) casserole dish. I used a Corning Ware 1.8 L French White Oval Casserole Dish and after one hour in the oven, plus an additional 10 minutes, it was still a bit under-done in the very center.


We really liked this recipe and would definitely make it again! Perhaps as a Thanksgiving Day side dish...the recipe made a LOT.



This recipe was handwritten on an index card. It was found in an old large recipe file box. The age of the recipe card is unknown.

The original recipe has been scanned and is transcribed below. It can be printed for use in your own home kitchen. Enjoy!

Please Note: Every effort has been made to transcribe these old recipe cards completely and accurately. Many have faded, are stained, or simply do not include every step or tool used in the process. We have changed the wording in some places and added instruction in others to make the text a bit clearer.

We do not test or verify all the information found on these old cards. If you choose use the information found here, please know that you do so at your own risk.


old fashioned, vintage recipe, corn casserole, side dishes, Thanksgiving recipes
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Carol's Corn Casserole

prep time: 15 minscook time: 1 hourtotal time: 1 hours and 15 mins
Find more vintage recipes at littlehouseincolorado.com

ingredients:


  • 1 can Creamed Corn
  • 1 can Whole Kernel Corn
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 cup Sour Cream
  • 1 cube  Margarine, softened (or butter)
  • 1 box Jiffy Corn Muffin Mix

instructions:

Combine ingredients and pour into a greased casserole dish. Top with buttered bread crumbs. Can also add 2 T sugar.

Bake at 350°F for 1 hour.

*for increased servings, add an additional 1 can of creamed corn, 1/2 cup sour cream and 1 egg to the ingredients.

NOTES:

A "cube" of margarine equals 1/2 cup. I used 1 stick of butter.

I did not have bread crumbs to use so I substituted crushed Ritz Crackers in place of the buttered bread crumbs. I also did not use the optional sugar in the topping. Ritz Crackers have their own sweetness to them.

I suggest using a shallow (2″ or so) casserole dish. I used a Corning Ware 1.8 L French White Oval Casserole Dish and after one hour in the oven, plus an additional 10 minutes, it was still a bit under-done in the very center.
Created using The Recipes Generator



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.


Monday, September 3, 2018

You Know You're A Canner When...

About six years ago, I learned how to waterbath can from one of my neighbors. Then in the fall of 2015, I learned how to pressure can. That opened up new worlds for me and my little hobby practically turned into a way of life.

Usually during the winter, I can meats, beans and stock. Then in the summer, I can fruits and veggies and I makes lots of pickles. We now have more food in the pantry that I canned than we have of food that was commercially canned. Let me tell you, that is a GREAT feeling.

The other day when I got the sales paper, I noticed Palisade peaches were on sale for 98 cents a pound.


Palisade Peaches are rarely less than $1.99/lb near me so I immediately began imagining all the things I could can from those peaches (peach jam, peach salsa, peach pie filling, sliced peaches...) and figuring up how many pounds I would need.

And I thought..."Welp...you can tell I'M A CANNER!"

And that sparked an idea for "You Know You're A Canner When..." a fun list of all those so-called crazy things canners do.


I started to jot down just a few things, but soon the ideas were flowing. I just kept writing them down...then I asked Mr. LH for ideas (he could see some of my quirky habits better than I could)...

I turned some of the list into a printable...

"You Know You're A Canner When..." digitable printable on Etsy. Or purchase it already printed for you from Zazzle.

which also found its way onto a t-shirt...

"You Know You're a Canner when..." t-shirt available on Etsy (as shown), on Amazonon Zazzle or on Redbubble.

But I wound up with so many more phrases than I could fit on any one printable or shirt (I'll have to make another soon)...so they're being listed here for your enjoyment.

How many of them describe you?


You Know You're A Canner When...


  1. You can spot a vintage jar from across the thrift store.
  2. A weekend spent canning at home sounds perfect.
  3. (insert random food) goes on sale and you buy 20 pounds.
  4. You go back to the store the next day because the 20 pounds you just bought won't be nearly enough for everything you discovered you could can with it.
  5. You refer to food as either "high acid" or "low acid."
  6. You can identify the age of a jar by looking at its logo.
  7. You find yourself eyeing the neighbor's fruit trees.
  8. Mason jars have replaced your drinking glasses, your flower vases, and your plastic food storage.
  9. You plan your garden based on your canning recipes.
  10. Your freezer has more scraps than food.
  11. You feel guilty buying commercially canned food.
  12. You stare lovingly at your pantry shelves.
  13. You think pressure is a good thing.
  14. You give canned food away and worry you'll never see those jars again.
  15. Extra canning rings are stored everywhere in your home...in bins, on bungee cords, on hangers...everywhere!
  16. You have to move because your jar stash has outgrown your home.
  17. You are not at all concerned about the zombie apocalypse (or a power outage/blizzard, etc).
  18. You look forward to cleaning out the freezer.
  19. You're more excited about making stock from the turkey carcass after Thanksgiving than you are about the holiday. (I am also guilty of buying extra turkeys on sale just for canning)
  20. You have an impressive jar stash (and it keeps growing).
  21. The "PING" of sealing jars is music to your ears.
  22. Your refrigerator is full of various half-full mason jars (and you're the only one who can identify everything).
  23. You put your life on hold because the (insert ripening food here) is finally "ready to be canned."
  24. Food goes on sale you immediately check to see if you can can it and everything you can make with it.
  25. Your friends post pictures of their kids/grandkids/pets on social media. You post pictures of food in jars.
  26. You check out the canning exhibit at the county fair, critique everything, and wonder if it was all processed correctly.
  27. A stranger mentions canning and you feel like you've just met your bosom buddy.
  28. You buy jars whenever they go on sale because...they're jars.
  29. You tell people you're growing "salsa" and "pickles" in the garden.
  30. You're the only person in the house who thinks the sound of the pressure canning weight is soothing.
  31. Someone posts free or cheap jars and you treat it like it's an emergency (gotta get them first, right?).
  32. Your spices, dry goods and leftovers are all stored in mason jars.
  33. You have a kitchen shelf dedicated to canning books and canning journals.
  34. You can whip up a tasty meal in under 15 minutes with a stove, a pot and a few jars of canned food.
  35. Finding a hidden case of jars in your home is cause for celebration.
  36. A jar breaks in the canner and you observe a moment of silence for both the broken jar and the loss of food.
  37. You buy vinegar by the gallon.
  38. You find out Ball has a jar coupon in the newspaper so you buy 40 copies.
  39. Your kitchen looks like a crime scene after pickling beets or pitting cherries.
  40. You think “Canning Season” is year-round (because hello...it is).



DISCLOSURE:This post may contain affiliate links. I earn from qualified purchases. Thank you for supporting Little House In Colorado.